Tuesday, February 14, 2017

An Exhibition Juxtaposing Edward Hopper's Paintings with Photography Influenced by The Artist's Approach + FOOD: Asian Eggplant Salad

Edward Hopper, The Painter, 1903-06
ART
Edward Hopper 
& Company
An Exhibition Juxtaposing 
Hopper Paintings with 
Photography influenced 
by Hopper's Approach.
presented by  
Fraenkel Gallery
San Francisco, CA

Edward Hopper’s relevance to American photography becomes clearer with every decade. His respect for humble subjects, his interest in psychological, his depth as a landscape artist, and his astonishing sensitivity to color and light are only some of the elements that led the writer Geoff Dyer to theorize that Hopper “could claim to be the most influential American photographer of the twentieth century - even though he didn’t take any photographs.”

The photographers whose work has been affected by Edward Hopper are numerous; here we focus only on four, with works from the 1960s and 1970s. Like Hopper, these artists were motivated by deep inner dictates. All worked (or still work) out of the “straight” photographic traditions, being essentially interested in the world as they find it. The intention in bringing these works together is not simply to match photographs with Hopper’s watercolors, but rather to better understand how aspects of Hopper’s sensibility are given new meaning through the language of photography.


Below, first see a series of Paintings by Edward Hopper from Fraenkel Gallery. Second there is a series of prominent photographic prints influenced by Edward Hopper. Check the availability for all works at Fraenkel Gallery, 49 Geary Street, 4th Floor San Francisco, CA 94108, <mail@fraenkelgallery.com> .

Edward Hopper, Circus Wagon, 1928

Edward Hopper, Wellfleet Road, 1931

Edward Hopper, Lombard's House, 1931

Robert Adams, Interstate 25, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1968

Robert Adams, Hotel, Bovina, Colorado 1965-68

Lee Friedlander, Memphis, 1973

Lee Friedlander, Western United States, 1975

Robert Adams, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1968

Robert Adams, Colorado, 1973-74

Lee Friedlander Kentucky, 1977

Stephen Shore, West Avenue, Great Barrington, Massachusetts, July 12, 1974


Diane Arbus, Woman at a counter, smoking, NYC 1962

Diane Arbus, A house on a hill, Hollywood, Cal. 1963
(Source: Fraenkel Gallery • San Francisco, CA photos taken by ARTSnFOOD staff with permission of the gallery.)  



FOOD
Asian Eggplant Salad

This sweet-spicy-hot salad of slippery strands of eggplant is always a favorite. Soaking sliced large eggplants in salt water rids them of any bitterness; if you use small Oriental eggplant, you can skip this step.

Ingredients:

1 large eggplant, about 1 1/4 lbs. OR 4 Oriental eggplants
5 cups water
2 teaspoons salt

Marinade 
3 Tablespoons red wine vinegar or rice vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon chili paste
1/2 teaspoon chili oil

Lettuce leaves for garnish

Instructions:
Peel eggplant and cut into 2 x 1 x 1/2 inch strips. Place in a medium bowl. Add water and salt, and toss gently to mix. Set aside for 30 minutes drain. Combine marinade ingredients in a small bowl and set aside.

To cook, place steaming rack in a wok. Pour water to just below level of rack and bring to a boil. Place eggplant strips on heatproof dish and set dish on rack. Cover and steam, adding additional water if necessary, for 20 to 30 minutes or until eggplant is tender when pierced with a fork but still holds its shape. Remove dish from steamer and let cool for 10 minutes. Drain liquid. Pour marinade over eggplant. Let stand at room temperature for 1 hour or cover and refrigerate for 4 hours or as long as overnight. To serve, line a serving platter with lettuce leaves. Using a slotted spoon, lift eggplant from marinade and place on top of lettuce. 

(Source: A Wok for All Seasons by Martin Yan)

Until later,
Jack

ARTSNFOOD IS AN ONLINE MAGAZINE DEDICATED TO PROVIDING ARTISTS AND COLLECTORS AROUND THE WORLD WITH HIGHLIGHTS OF CURRENT ART EXHIBITIONS, AND TO ENCOURAGE ALL READERS TO INVEST IN AND PARTICIPATE IN "THE JOY OF ART"® AND CULTURE. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. ALL CONCEPTS, ORIGINAL ART, TEXT & PHOTOGRAPHS IN THIS POSTING (WHICH ARE NOT CREDITED) ARE © COPYRIGHT 2017 JACK A. ATKINSON UNDER ALL INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND COPYRIGHT LAWS. ALL GALLERY, EVENT, MUSEUM, FAIR OR FESTIVAL PHOTOGRAPHS WERE TAKEN WITH PERMISSION. IMAGES © INDIVIDUAL ARTISTS, 

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Philippe de Montebello Video + FOOD:Tomato Grande Breakfast Drink

Philippe de Montebello

ART
Philippe de Montebello
Here is a great video we want to share about Philippe de Montebello's time as the Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City!




(Source:Great Museums YouTube Channel.)

FOOD
Tomato Grande
For all who love vegetables, this fresh produce breakfast drink is refreshing.

Ingredients:
25 ripe tomatoes (or one 16-ounce can of tomatoes and one 46-oz can of tomato juice)
2 green bell peppers, seeded and chopped
4 ribs celery, chopped
1 small onion, chopped
2 cucumbers, sliced
1 small zucchini or other summer squash, chopped
1 cup chopped fresh parsley
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon chili powder (optional)
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 cups vegetable broth

Instructions:
If using ripe tomatoes put them into a large pan of boiling water, a few at a time, for 30 to 6o seconds until skins become loose. Remove tomatoes from boiling water (a slotted spoon works well) and slip off the peels. Discard peels. Slice tomatoes, reserving juice.

You'll have more ingredients than your blender will hold, so you'll need to blend the ingredients in batches. Start with 5 or 6 peeled tomatoes (or some of the canned tomatoes with some of the tomato juice); add some of the vegetables (green pepper, celery, onion, cucumber and zucchini), some of the seasonings (parsley, vinegar, olive oil, chili powder and garlic) and about a cup of broth. Blend on high speed until smooth. 

Pour half the mixture out of the blender container into a large mixing bowl. Add more tomatoes and tomato juice, vegetables, seasonings and broth; blend. Repeat process until all ingredients are blended.

Mix the blended ingredients with wire whisk. Refrigerate, covered, overnight to let flavors blend. Mixture will keep up to week in the refrigerator. 

(Source: Alcohol-Free Drinks for All Occasions edited by B. G. Ostmann and J. Baker)

Until later,
Jack

ARTSNFOOD IS AN ONLINE MAGAZINE DEDICATED TO PROVIDING ARTISTS AND COLLECTORS AROUND THE WORLD WITH HIGHLIGHTS OF CURRENT ART EXHIBITIONS, AND TO ENCOURAGE ALL READERS TO INVEST IN AND PARTICIPATE IN "THE JOY OF ART"® AND CULTURE. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. ALL CONCEPTS, ORIGINAL ART, TEXT & PHOTOGRAPHS IN THIS POSTING (WHICH ARE NOT CREDITED) ARE © COPYRIGHT 2017 JACK A. ATKINSON UNDER ALL INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND COPYRIGHT LAWS. ALL GALLERY, EVENT, MUSEUM, FAIR OR FESTIVAL PHOTOGRAPHS 

Sunday, January 29, 2017

"UNFINISHED - Thoughts Left Visible" at Met Breuer + FOOD: Eggs w/Almond Chicken Hash


ART
UNFINISHED WORK! 
Unfinished art allows
us to see the working 
process and techniques
of great artists of
our past!

How did Picasso or Degas or other great artists start their paintings? Did they block in the color, start with a graphite drawing on the canvas or just rough in the preliminary drawing with their brush and keep correcting as they worked? Unfinished art give us insights into these questions. 

Last year the Metropolitan Museum of Art had an exhibition at the new Met Breuer on Madison Ave, in NYC titled "UNFINISHED Thoughts Left Visible." Let's look over the shoulder of these great artists and see how they made some of the paintings in that exhibition!

























































































































(Source: All Photos by ARTSnFOOD staff, taken with permission of the museum.  Wall plaque text is copyright, Metropolitan Museum of Art.) 

FOOD
Eggs w/Almond Chicken Hash

Ingredients:

1 cup sliced mushrooms
1/2 cup sliced almonds
2 tablespoons butter
2 cups diced, cooked chicken
2 1/2 cups Cream Sauce (recipe below)
Salt, freshly ground pepper to taste
8 eggs
Paprika, to taste

Instructions:

Sauté the mushrooms and almonds in the butter. Add the chicken and cream sauce. Add salt and pepper to taste and turn into a shallow baking dish. Chill until needed or bake at 350 degrees until heated through (about 30 minutes). The eggs may be baked in "wells" on the hash or done in a pan and placed alongside the hash on the serving plate. Sprinkle with paprika as desired.
Serves 4.

Cream Sauce Recipe:

Ingredients:
6 tablespoons butter
6 tablespoons flour
2 cups light cream
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Instructions:
Melt the butter and stir in the flour. Gradually add the milk and chicken stock, stirring and heating until thick.

(Source: The Great Country Inns of America Cookbook.)


Until later,
Jack
ARTSNFOOD IS AN ONLINE MAGAZINE DEDICATED TO PROVIDING ARTISTS AND COLLECTORS AROUND THE WORLD WITH HIGHLIGHTS OF CURRENT ART EXHIBITIONS, AND TO ENCOURAGE ALL READERS TO INVEST IN AND PARTICIPATE IN "THE JOY OF ART"® AND CULTURE. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. ALL CONCEPTS, ORIGINAL ART, TEXT & PHOTOGRAPHS IN THIS POSTING (WHICH ARE NOT CREDITED) ARE © COPYRIGHT 2017 JACK A. ATKINSON UNDER ALL INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND COPYRIGHT LAWS. ALL GALLERY, EVENT, MUSEUM, FAIR OR FESTIVAL PHOTOGRAPHS