Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Norma Jeane Mortenson is Very Photogenic - Images of Marilyn Monroe + FOOD: Dinner Party Seafood Pasta

"Marilyn" by Andy Warhol

ART
MARILYN MONROE is
AN ICONIC IMAGE in
CONTEMPORARY ART

Marilyn Monroe has become as much a part of the art scene as the contemporary art stars who are featured at major art galleries and art auctions. As a "Madonna figure", a beautiful symbol of the perfect female body, as a model for photographers in the 1950s & 60s, or just as a contemporary image of fame and stardom, Marilyn's image has grown to become a major player in art today! 

Artists are drawn to Marilyn Monroe images.

Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson; June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962) was an American actress and model. Famous for playing "dumb blonde" characters, she became one of the most popular sex symbols of the 1950s, emblematic of the era's attitudes towards sexuality. She continues to be considered a major popular culture icon.


There are hundreds of thousands of art images using Marilyn as the subject.
It's like: "Oh, here's a Marilyn 
technique no-one has thought of yet!?!"
Born and raised in Los Angeles, Monroe spent most of her childhood in foster homes and an orphanage and married for the first time at the age of sixteen. While working in a factory as part of the WWII war effort in 1944, she met a photographer and began a successful pin-up modeling career. The work led to film contracts. After a series of minor film roles, she signed a contract with Fox in 1951. Over the next two years, she became a popular actress with roles in several comedies, including As Young as You Feel and Monkey Business, and in the dramas Clash by Night and Don't Bother to Knock. Monroe posed for nude photos before becoming a star, but rather than damaging her career, that story increased interest in her films.


Marilyn Monroe images.


By 1953, Monroe was one of the most bankable Hollywood stars, with leading roles in three films: the noir Niagra, which focused on her sex appeal, and the comedies Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and How to Marry a Millionaire, which established her star image as a "dumb blonde". Although she played a significant role in the creation and management of her public image throughout her career, she was disappointed at being typecast and underpaid by the studio. She was briefly suspended in early 1954 for refusing a film project, but returned to star in one of the biggest box office successes of her career, The Seven Year Itch (1955). When the studio was still reluctant to change her contract, Monroe founded a film production company in late 1954, Marilyn Monroe Productions (MMP). She dedicated 1955 to building her company and began studying method acting at the Actors Studio. In late 1955, Fox awarded her a new contract, which gave her more control and a larger salary. After a critically acclaimed performance in Bus Stop (1956) and acting in the first independent production of MMP, The Prince and the Showgirl (1957), she won a Golden Globe for Best Actress for Some Like It Hot (1959). Her last completed film was the drama The Misfits (1961).




Monroe's troubled private life received much attention. She struggled with addiction, depression, and anxiety. She had two highly publicized marriages, to baseball player Joe DiMaggio and playwright Arthur Miller, which both ended in divorce. She died at the age of 36 from an overdose of barbiturates at her home in Los Angeles on August 5, 1962. Although the death was ruled a suicide, conspiracy theories still surround the details of her death.
Digitally painted.

Wn she was Norma Jeane

















 (Source: Text adapted from Wikipedia - Photos from many online sites.)

FOOD

Dinner Party Seafood Pasta

At a recent dinner party, we served this seafood spaghetti. It was so fresh and very much enjoyed by all!

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 large eggs, beaten until yellow
  • 1/2 cup finely grated Pecorino Romano cheese (or Parmesan Cheese)
  • 1 package (16oz) of Angel Hair Spaghetti
  • 3/4 stick of salted butter, cut into 1/4" knobs
  • Fresh Ground Pepper & Ground Sea Salt 
  • Dried Basil

SPAGHETTI DIRECTIONS

  1. In a medium bowl, beat the eggs the mix in the grated cheese.
  2. In a large pot of salted boiling water (as salty as the sea), cook the spaghetti al dente. Drain, reserving some of the cooking water.
  3. In a large bowl, toss the HOT pasta with the butter plus the egg mixture, (the hot pasta will cook the eggs to some degree). If the pasta is still a bit stiff add reserved pasta water one tablespoon at a time. Toss the pasta until coated in a creamy, cheesy sauce. 
    Season with pepper to taste, add salt if needed. 
    Serve the pasta on plates.

SEAFOOD DIRECTIONS

  1. Cook Shrimp, Lobster, and Sea Scallops separately in the manner you like best.
    Add some of each of these shellfish to the top of each plate of finished spaghetti 

PLATING

  1. Sprinkle the platted seafood pasta lightly with dried or chopped fresh basel. 
    Serve, passing more grated cheese at the table.
(Source: Atkinson Family Cookbook)
Until later,
Jack
ARTSnFOOD is an online magazine dedicated to providing artists and collectors around the world with highlights of current art exhibitions, and to encourage all readers to invest in and participate in "The Joy of Art"® and culture. All rights reserved. All Concepts, Original Art, Text & Photographs in this posting (which are not credited) are © Copyright 2016 Jack A. Atkinson under all International intellectual property and copyright laws. All gallery, event, museum, fair or festival photographs were taken with permission. Images © individual artists, 

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

MY LOVE OF ART: LOST BECAUSE I WALKED AWAY when I was young and impressionable + FOOD: Crispy Potato, Onion, & Mushroom Rosti

("Cedar Drawing" by Jack A. Atkinson, Ink & Brush on Arches Paper)

I STOPPED MAKING ART
DURING 
"ADOLESCENCE
POSTURING" - 
THINKING
I WAS NO GOOD & 
I WAS EMBARRASSED
TO BE AN ARTIST!
AS AN ADULT,
I LONG FOR THE
LOVE I LOST.
Editor's Note:
This issue has been adapted from The Painters Keys blog.
"Finding Yourself Again" which was first published on July 2, 2004. 
Here the text has been edited and altered 
to change the emphasis from
writing and writers, to art and artists.

(For the referenced original, go top painterskeys.com 7-2-2004.)

The Letter: 

I grew up in an environment that did not stimulate creative development. Nevertheless, in adolescence I was a prolific artist. But suddenly I stopped. I remember thinking that the art I created wasn’t any good, and that I shouldn’t draw or paint any more. I put everything I had produced into the garbage. I don’t know why. Now ten years have passed and I haven’t painted, drawn or created any art since my decision to quit.

What I find curious is that I still remember the pleasure making art gave to me, and being frequently in a state of ‘flow.’ I would like to recapture that same pleasure, the creativity that I had, and begin drawing and painting again. I don’t know exactly where to start and don’t have a clue if I’m on the right path.

Any suggestions?

The Reply:

Thanks for that. In order to rekindle your love and perhaps your proficiency you have to understand what went on. In your teenage innocence you wrote because "it gave you joy". Then your restrictive environment kicked in and gave you the excuse to stop. You destroyed your stuff because your discipline was external. You must now internalize your discipline. Actually, this adolescent action-reaction is commonplace. While many flames are permanently snuffed, they need not be.

Some folks figure it out and end up “loving” again.

Here’s how they do it:

• Allocate an hour for art every single day.

• Do whatever holds your interest or takes your fancy.

• If you can’t think of anything to draw or paint, create something anyway.
Rely on your natural wisdom, trust yourself and follow your instincts.

• Do ART for no other reason than to give yourself joy.

• In your spare time look at the art of others you admire.

• When painting or drawing... scraping and repainting... erasing and redrawing... when you think you’re finally getting it right, STOP and get a clean canvas or paper, then make the work you have now clearly envisioned, one-time, cleanly and directly.

• Share your efforts only with trusted friends.

• Look for the gleams of a personal style, when you notice it, double down "THERE", your signature style is developing", go in that direction.

• Fall in love with your process, the grind of working at your craft.

• Photograph, Document and Archive your work as you go. You will never regret being able to see how it has progressed.

• Give the above process some honest effort - for at least a six week period. 

• You will find "LOVE" again!

___________

• “Success is nothing more than a few simple disciplines, practiced every day, while failure is simply a few errors in judgment, repeated every day.” -Jim Rohn 

• “We find our freedom along the guiding lines of discipline.” -Yehudi Menuhin

• (ART) “Writing has laws of perspective, of light and shade just as painting does, or music. If you are born knowing them, fine. If not, learn them. Then rearrange the rules to suit yourself.” -Truman Capote

• "I know 'my worth'. I embrace 'my power'. 'I SAY' if I'm beautiful. 'I SAY' if I'm strong. You will not determine my story... I will." - Amy Schumer

• “Artistically I am still a child with a whole life ahead of me to discover and create. I want something, but I won’t know what it is until I succeed in doing it.” -Alberto Giacometti 

 "...we do not strive to be firemen, we do not strive to be bankers, nor policemen, nor doctors. WE STRIVE TO BE OURSELVES." -Hunter S. Thompson 

It’s not easy to strive to be ourselves!

Mainly because we must recognize who we are at our core and listen to our soul. We all (subconsciously) know our soul, yet we want to control or override what our essence is telling us. It is natural to want to please and to be what others want or what our peer group or society at large prefers.

The ARTS - being an Artist, Writer, Dancer, Thespian, Creative Chef, Singer, or Musician is defined by this dilemma - going against what others want for us, causing us to fight for who we know we are. Keep in mind, these outside pressures believe they are looking out for our best interests. The ARTS are generally made up of gentle souls who do not enjoy telling others NO, “I am going to do my life, my way,” but it’s important to recognize our "true self", the unique individual, the real you.

I think I’ll be me! You can be you!

(Source for much of this article: The Painter’s Keys blog, published by Robert Genn and Sara Phina, go to: painterskeys.com July 2, 2004)


FOOD

Crispy Potato, Onion, and Mushroom Rosti

This vegan dish is crispy and golden brown on the outside, yet creamy and tender in the middle with the rich flavor of sautéed onions and mushrooms. 
Note: For best results, cut potatoes into 1/16th-inch matchsticks (by hand, on a mandoline, using the large holes of a box grater, or the large shredding disk of a food processor).
(Makes one 10-inch pie-like rösti, serving 2 to 4 people)
INGREDIENTS
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 medium russet potatoes (about 1 pound) rinsed and cut into 1/16th-inch matchsticks or grated (see note above)
  • 1 medium onion, finely sliced (about 1 cup)
  • 4 ounces button mushrooms, finely sliced
  • 2 cloves, grated on a microplane grater
  • 1 teaspoon picked fresh thyme leaves
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS

• Spread potatoes on a large microwave-safe plate and microwave on high heat until hot all the way through and softened but still slightly crunchy, about 5 minutes.

• Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon oil in a 10-inch well seasoned cast iron or nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add onions and mushrooms and cook, stirring and tossing occasionally, until softened and starting to brown, about 8 minutes. Add garlic and thyme and cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to a small bowl and wipe out skillet.

• Heat 2 tablespoons oil in skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Add half of potatoes and press into bottom of the pan with a rubber spatula. Season with salt and pepper. Spread onion/mushroom mixture evenly over the potatoes and top with remaining potatoes. Press down into an even disk shape using a rubber spatula. Season top with salt and pepper.
• Cook, swirling and shaking pan occasionally until deep golden brown and crisp on the first side, about 7 minutes. Carefully slide rösti to a large plate. Set another plate on top of it upside down, grip the edges, and invert the whole thing so the rösti is now cooked-side-up. Heat remaining two tablespoons oil in the skillet and slide rösti back in. Continue cooking, swirling and shaking pan occasionally until deep golden brown and crisp on the second side, about 7 minutes longer. Slide rösti to a cutting board. Serve immediately with a side of vegan aioli. 

(Source: seriouseats.com)
Until later,
Jack
ARTSnFOOD is an online magazine dedicated to providing artists and collectors around the world with highlights of current art exhibitions, and to encourage all readers to invest in and participate in "The Joy of Art"® and culture. All rights reserved. All Concepts, Original Art, Text & Photographs in this posting (which are not credited) are © Copyright 2016 Jack A. Atkinson under all International intellectual property and copyright laws. All gallery, event, museum, fair or festival photographs were taken with permission. Images © individual artists, 

Thursday, July 28, 2016

The American Indian As Portrayed by 19th Century Artists at Crystal Bridges Museum + Food: Parmesan-Roasted Cauliflower


A Native American Brave 
(detail of marble sculpture)
Artist: Randolph Rogers 1825-1892
title: "Atala and Chactas" c. 1854

ART
At Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art a new exhibit, titled "Changing Perspectives of Native Americans", shows how the American Indians were portrayed by European and early Euro-American artists.


Currently in one of Crystal Bridges' museum galleries there are artworks which reflect the world's shifting attitudes toward American Indians during the 1800s (the 19th century).


Artist: Randolph Rogers 1825-1892
title: "Atala and Chactas" c. 1854
marble sculpture
Detail of Native American Female
Artist: Randolph Rogers 1825-1892
title: "Atala and Chactas" c. 1854
marble sculpture


Artist: George Winter, title: "Ten Potawatomi Chiefs", c. 1837

Artist: Charles Bird King, title: "Portrait of Croushing Eagle"


Artist: Charles Bird King, title: "Portrait of Ottoe Half Chief"


Artist: Charles Bird King, title: "Portrait of John Ridge"




Artist: Cyrus Edwin Dallin, Title: "On the Warpath"


Artist: Edmonia Lewis, Title: "The Old Arrow Maker"


Artist: Edward Sheriff Curtis, Title: "Chief Hector - Assiniboin"


Artist: Edward Sheriff Curtis, Title: "Lodge of the Horn Society - Blood"
Artist: Edward Sheriff Curtis , title: "On the Shores of Nootka"


Artist: Albert Bierstadt, title:"Indians Fishing"

Artist: Worthington Whittredge,
title: "Twilight on the Plains, Platte River, Colorado" c. 1866-1867


Artist: George de Forest Brush, Title: "The Indian and the Lily"

Artist: Henry Kirke Brown, 
title: "The Choosing of the Arrow"


Artist: George Winter, Title: "Eight Potawatomi Natives"

Artist: George Catlin, title: "Indian Encampment" c. 1852-1868
Artist: Thomas Cole, title: "Landscape with Indian" c. 1826

Artist: James Wooldridge, Title: "Indians of Virginia"
Detail of "Indians of Virginia" - Artist: James Wooldridge

Detail of "Indians of Virginia" - Artist: James Wooldridge

Detail of "Indians of Virginia" - Artist: James Wooldridge

(Source: Photos taken with permission of Crystal Bridges Museum by ARTSnFOOD staff. Text / wall plaque descriptions, by Crystal Bridges museum's staff.)


Food
Parmesan-Roasted
Cauliflower

Ingredients
  • 1 head cauliflower
  • 1 sliced medium onion
  • 4 thyme sprigs
  • 4 unpeeled garlic cloves
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan
Directions
• Preheat oven to 425°F. Cut 1 head cauliflower into florets; 
• Toss on a large rimmed baking sheet with 1 sliced medium onion, 4 thyme sprigs, 4 unpeeled garlic cloves, and 3 tablespoons olive oil; 
• Season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. 
• Roast, tossing occasionally, until almost tender, 35-40 minutes. 
• Sprinkle with 1/2 cup grated Parmesan, toss to combine, and roast until cauliflower is tender, 10-12 minutes longer.

(Source: the Atkinson Family Cookbook,)

Until later,
Jack
ARTSnFOOD is an online magazine dedicated to providing artists and collectors around the world with highlights of current art exhibitions, and to encourage all readers to invest in and participate in "The Joy of Art"® and culture. All rights reserved. All Concepts, Original Art, Text & Photographs in this posting (which are not credited) are © Copyright 2016 Jack A. Atkinson under all International intellectual property and copyright laws. All gallery, event, museum, fair or festival photographs were taken with permission. Images © individual artists, 

Monday, July 18, 2016

Inside the Mind of an Artist + Spencer Tunick's Nudes + FOOD: Baked Zucchini Chips

Detail of art installation: "Yellow Sphere",
medium: translucent plex & steel wires,  220 cm diameter
by artist Lulio le Parc
EDITOR'S NOTE: In our ART 2 section, the subject matter of Spencer Tunick’s art photos is the nude figure. These images may be inappropriate for some sensibilities and for some work and family situations. Please do not scroll down to view this article if art photographs of male and female nudity, in all shapes and sizes, will offend you, your coworkers, your family, etc.- Thank you.

ART 1
Looking inside 
“The Mind of an Artist!”

For the most part, artists and creative people make their work alone. So "self-talk" is generally the only conversation going-on, in the artist's studio!

• From art critic Jerry Saltz:
“While artists stare at the blank paper/canvas they say their mantra:  I Can't Draw. I'm A Fake. I Can't Schmooze. What I'm Doing Doesn't Matter. I'm Poor. I’m Doomed Because I Did Not Go To The Right Schools. No One Cares About My Work. I'm Not Original….” Does this sound familiar to any artists you know? It's easier to find reasons things aren't working out for you, rather than saying to yourself, "Screw it - I'm doing it!" Just go for it!

• The Creative Process 
as it unfolds in the mind of an artist:

1) This is going to be awesome!
2) Making this “work” is a bit tricky.
3) This is crap!
4) I am crap!
5) Hold on, it’s is starting to work again - I may be OK.
6) WOW, THIS IS AWESOME!  
7) I'M AWESOME!

• Make It Work
An instructors while I was in art school said: 

“As soon as you make a single mark on that expensive paper or canvas, whatever you paid for those materials has just vanished - you've ruined it - it's now worthless! As an artist, your job, using your talents and knowledge, is to make that paper or canvas have value AGAIN!”
- Jack Atkinson

• The Power of a Schedule 
Productive artists do not wait for motivation and inspiration to strike, but simply set a schedule for working on a consistent basis - this easy to say, but hard to do.

• The Power of a Place to Work
Research studies on willpower and motivation back up the statement: “If you waste resources trying to decide when or where to work, you’ll impede your capacity to do the work.” 

• Visual Art does not need words to communicate.

• Why Do So Many Fine Artists Say They Have Trouble Making Money?
Starving is the word so many people put in front of the title "artist". Art is like professional tennis, there are few at the very top of the profession doing very well. In fine art, 25 to 100 art stars are wealthy beyond comprehension! Again, just like tennis, the 200th best artist in the USA has little fame and usually is not making a ton of money from their art. What creates this phenomenon in the world of professional fine art? The easy answer to this question can be found in the motivation most artists have for being an artist, i.e.: 
ARTISTS 
HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY, 
NOT SOMETHING TO SELL!

Most artist struggle with this delima, they just want to do their art, and hope someone will come along and promote them, creating the recognition they deserve.

Get real! In today's world, this is happening less and less. 
To Artists: get up off you butt, go around showing your work and make it happen for yourself!

AGAIN / EDITOR'S NOTE: In our ART 2 section, the subject matter of Spencer Tunick’s art photos is the nude figure. These images may be inappropriate for some sensibilities and for some work and family situations. Please do not scroll down to view this article if art showing male and female nudity will offend you, your coworkers, your family, etc.- Thank you.

ART 2

Photographer Spencer Tunick 
turns thousands of nude bodies
into environmental sculptures,
then takes his pictures.


Photographer Spencer Tunick's request for volunteers never fails to attract thousands who want to participate in his mass photos of humans gathered together, completely in the buff. 
Each participant has a different reason for being involved. Whether wanting to accept or celebrate their (youthful or aging) bodies or just to experience a once-in-a-lifetime experience, that all participants say is "freeing", with nothing to hide and all of your physical imperfections exposed to the world in broad daylight. In these mass nude photographs the anxiety of being nude is diminished as the crowd disrobes, and distinctions between bodies begin to be barely distinguishable and certainly insignificant.

His latest project was at the opening of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland where 100 women gathered naked in a field across from the convention center. The project rejects the sexualization and objectification of the female nude figure. Instead, Tunick’s images present the nude as something naturally empowering, courageous and his work is a collaborative effort.

(Source: All photographs and the source for the text was first published by the huffington post and authored by Priscilla Frank. Please go to their link (below) for the complete story, more details and more photographs. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/100-women-just-got-naked-together-at-the-republican-national-convention_us_578cc902e4b0867123e1bf86 )

Spencer Tunick at Mexico City's Zocalo square on May 6, 2007.

Spencer Tunick at Mexico City's Zocalo square on May 6, 2007.

Spencer Tunick at Mexico City's Zocalo square on May 6, 2007. A record 18,000 people took off their clothes.

Spencer Tunick in front of the Gaasbeek's Castle on July 9, 2011.

Spencer Tunick  in the northern Portuguese village of Santa Maria da Feira on September 13, 2003.

Spencer Tunick in downtown Munich on June 23, 2012.

Spencer Tunick in front of the Sydney Opera House on March 1, 2010.

Spencer Tunick a three-dimensional body sculpture at the Museum Kunst Palast in Duesseldorf on August 6, 2006. 

Spencer Tunick at San Sebastian's Kursaal auditorium on April 22, 2006.

Spencer Tunick in a vineyard of Pouilly-Fuisse in Fuisse on October 3, 2009.

Spencer Tunick at the Ernst Happel soccer stadium in Vienna on May 11, 2008.


Spencer Tunick in downtown Munich on June 23, 2012.

Spencer Tunick in front of the Sydney Opera House on March 1, 2010.

Spencer Tunick in front of the Sydney Opera House on March 1, 2010.

Spencer Tunick in the Europarking building in Amsterdam on June 3, 2007. 
Spencer Tunick in the northern Belgian city of Bruges on May 7, 2005. 

Spencer Tunick on the Aletsch glacier on August 18, 2007 a Greenpeace campaign highlighting climate change.


Spencer Tunick pillow fight  in front of the Gaasbeek's Castle on July 9, 2011.

Spencer Tunick Saatchi Gallery in London on April 15, 2003.

Spencer Tunick taken at Hot Springs New Mexico


Spencer Tunick at RNC shoot. Photo credit Huffington Post / Lindsey Byrnes, July 17, 2016. LINK:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/100-women-just-got-naked-together-at-the-republican-national-convention_us_578cc902e4b0867123e1bf86

Detail of a production still from Spencer Tunick's shoot at the RNC.
Photo credit: Huffington Post / Lindsey Byrnes, July 17, 2016. LINK:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/100-women-just-got-naked-together-at-the-republican-national-convention_us_578cc902e4b0867123e1bf86

(Source: All photographs and the source for the text was first published by the huffington post, the RNC story was authored by Priscilla Frank. Please go to their site, {link below} for the complete story, more details and more photographs. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/100-women-just-got-naked-together-at-the-republican-national-convention_us_578cc902e4b0867123e1bf86 )

SINCE IN THIS ISSUE ALL READERS HAVE PREVIOUSLY ACCEPTED NUDITY PRESENTED IN THE PURSUIT OF ART - Here is an interesting video. It shows the animation process and how knowledge of anatomy is a huge asset in animation of humans.






Animated run by Vladdesign44

FOOD
Oven Baked 
Zucchini Chips

INGREDIENTS 
1 (large) zucchini, cut into 1/8" - 1/4" slices
1/3 cup whole grain breadcrumbs, optional Panko
1/4 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese, reduced fat
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
Kosher or sea salt to taste
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
3 tablespoons low-fat milk

DIRECTIONS
Thinly slice the zucchini with a mandolin slicer. Mix all dry ingredients together, except zucchini. Dip slices in the milk then dump them into a gallon size bag filled with the dry seasoning, shake to coat, dump onto a cookie sheet, bake at 425F until crispy brown.
Serve warm or at room temperature. 


Until later,
Jack

ARTSnFOOD is an online magazine dedicated to providing artists and collectors around the world with highlights of current art exhibitions, and to encourage all readers to invest in and participate in "The Joy of Art"® and culture. All rights reserved. All Concepts, Original Art, Text & Photographs in this posting (which are not credited) are © Copyright 2016 Jack A. Atkinson under all International intellectual property and copyright laws. All gallery, event, museum, fair or festival photographs were taken with permission. Images © individual artists, fabricators, respective owners or assignees.